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This comes from the architecture. Rolling from the paddock to the startline, the SP2 creates a real stir, passing through a constant Mexican Wave of smartphones. We still caught the AI dawdling in the first couple of corners as they tried not to hit each other, but as the pack fanned out they relaxed and became more competitive. After crossing the finishing line in two of our races, the car appeared to apply full steering lock to the left, bunging it into a barrier. The idea of driving this, without a roof, with no helmet and windscreen, is for me really impressive. We tested out the multi-class option in the race settings during a trip to the Circuit de la Sarthe. You have to be aware of blue flags telling you to give way and be aware of your blindspots in case a prototype is trying to creep past, though, but that only adds to the sensation of WEC-style racing. It stops well too, its composite brakes grabbing from cold impressively well. On two other separate occurences, our car seemed to jump over invisible speed bumps. Rolling from the paddock to the startline, the SP2 creates a real stir, passing through a constant Mexican Wave of smartphones. The first drive out was a cautious one; humming around in the middle of the pack getting a feel for everything. I played it on Xbox One with a regular controller and found the handling system a little too twitchy to modulate properly, the menu system baffling and the AI sometimes bounced from robotic to neurotic. The car production run will be split between single-seat SP1s and dual-seat SP2 Monzas, dictated by customer preference. People lean toward the open cockpit to ask questions — how much, how fast, how many to be built, and does it really have no roof? And beneath it, the V12 engine from the Superfast, with variable inlet tracts for yet more power.

More tracks, more cars and more flexibility. This is more than a pure styling study — on the basis of this ride, the SP2 Monza is as breathtaking dynamically as it is aesthetically. This is part of our history, but I also love the idea of being part of the machine, with a level of symbiosis beyond anything else — essentially you sit in the car, with the carrozzeria at eye level.

It stops well too, its composite brakes grabbing from cold impressively well. In both versions the driver is encircled in a sweep of elliptical carbonfibre, the sparse driving instruments supplemented by an offset lower panel housing supplementary controls.

People lean toward the open cockpit to ask questions — how much, how fast, how many to be built, and does it really have no roof?

It feels every bit as fast as one might imagine a carbonfibre car with bhp would. The size of the bonnet, for instance, one gigantic composite clamshell. The tiny doors swing upward and you clamber over the high-cut sides being ever so careful not to scuff anything, given that price and drop into a blood-red bucket seat with race harnesses.

In both versions the driver is encircled in a sweep of elliptical carbonfibre, the sparse driving instruments supplemented by an offset lower panel housing supplementary controls.

On our gamepad, the steering still felt on the twitchy side but was a little more pliant on the default sensitivity settings. This car, despite the name, is not a modern interpretation of the Monza.

The idea of driving this, without a roof, with no helmet and windscreen, is for me really impressive. The first drive out was a cautious one; humming around in the middle of the pack getting a feel for everything.

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